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20121129
20121207
STATION
KQED (PBS) 16
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 2:30pm PST
of it? >> i am not worried about that for one simple reason. you cannot spend the energy of invention or creativity it. followed by the ipad and so on. people get caught by this. i mean, what can this do? a few years ago, and mobile telephone in a suitcase. today, in your pocket. carrying with them certain baggage of values. imperceptibly, they affect things. there is this culture. ways of thinking, you know? presenting it as an alternative. you do not have to throw away your ipod because you are a follower. you can be as materialistic as you what. being grounded in certain basic -- i do not want to say the turmoil. basic values. being selective about what you take from the exterior world. tavis: these questions are difficult because they are different in different parts of the continent. you are the perfect person to answer this question given your own history. being a political prisoner, etc., etc.. >> the very negative. very pessimistic. let's put it this way. is the continent progressive? no, it is not. there are pockets here and there. you find is one step forward, several steps
PBS
Nov 28, 2012 7:00pm PST
hasn't worked itself out. there is still a business re-up cycle. and finally energy. i think energy, whether it is big or small, is attractive at this point in time. the u.s. is fighting to have more available energy than we ever thought we had in the last 30 or 40 years. and i think that industry, as it develops, will be profitable for the people in it. >> tom: a little bit of optimism from the desk of wells fargo. john manley with wells fargo funds. >> susie: good news on gas prices: they're falling after spiking because of hurricane sandy. that's welcome relief to many drivers, but it still costs more to fill up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas,
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 7:00pm PST
that getting into the energy business doesn't mean the company is turning its back on mining. under the deal, freeport will pay $6.9 billion for plains exploration and production and $2.1 billion for mcmoran exploration, a sister company it was separated from a couple of decades ago. the deal would also leave freeport with $20 billion of debt. freeport executives say getting into oil and natural gas would help diversify the company and keep more of its assets in north america, where there's a huge shale gas boom. they estimate by next year freeport will derive a little more than a quarter of its profits from energy and the rest from mining, versus 100% from mining today. the company says it thinks demand for commodities, especially energy, will continue to grow. that could help offset the increased difficulty mining companies are having trying to find new projects in regions outside the u.s. and with interest rates currently at historic lows, the timing was right to ink the two deals. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> tom: daniel rohr is a metals and mining analyst from morningstar and
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 2:30pm PST
? >> it is huge. you do not have to expand in the energy -- expend any energy on trying to here with someone else's years. that is the worst feeling. it is corrosive and in cities to be writing a song, and half with through -- maybe you are excited about the song. maybe it is meaningful to you. halfway through, you go, they are not going to like it. it is deflating. it is really hard to not be affected by it. i like to feel i am a person who says, i do not care what other people think. i think the act of being a musician is so much about being open and empathetic, and not having these boundaries. you cannot control some of the negative stuff that comes in. i feel like i should not have been affected by that, but i admit that i was, and i have them, in other ways. i have been. it is a terrible feeling to go, i thought this was pretty good, but it is not going to be good in the right way. maybe good is just not interesting. tavis: i hear that wrestling, and yet i am trying to figure out, for you, and even for myself -- everyone of us is an artist in our own right in something. you have to figure ou
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 7:30pm PST
recognize that the work they do there on our energy security and also to make sure that we keep our country safe is very important. they employ so many employees, but having a member of congress who will invest in them so that we can take those green energy jobs, the technology they work on, to make us more energy independent and rely less on foreign sources of oil, well, i want to transfer those technologies and innovation out to the private sector so we can grow our local economy and also make our earth a little bit healthier. >> what about something like the high speed rail? transportation, of course, is a big issue for your district. where do you stand on that, and in general, transportation, what difference do you want to make there while you're back there in congress? >> i am seeking a spot on the transportation and infrastructure committee. there is no member in the bay area today that sits on that committee. of course, as you know, just recently the california legislature and governor have signed a bill that would provide billions in funding for the high speed rail, so i want to mak
PBS
Dec 1, 2012 12:00am PST
was that it gave him this energy for the night work. now in the wilderness years of the 1930s, the night work, of course, was meant for his other career as a writer. that is when he got these enormous book commissions actually completed. he carried over exactly the same activity into the war pretending that it was because of reasons of state. molasses maybe, but it was actually replicating the same pattern that he had already established as a writer. >> he worked best after a good meal, well lubricated with good champagne, and so on and then he was really tanked up for several hours of really serious work. >> so you have got him -- >> then take a sleeping pill. >> you have got to feel-- you have to feel quite sorry for the admirals and general, really. if you go and look at the cabinet war rooms, you know, in london. and there is his chair. and the actual geography of this room is quite extraordinary he would have these unfortunate generals in front of him and he had this chair rather like these here. and actually if you look at them they are ridged on the side because he wore-- and he would
PBS
Dec 3, 2012 3:00pm PST
from behind. for more on this, i am joined by coral davenport, the energy and environment correspondent for "national journal." you read a lot of these reports. as you read this one, what struck you as brand new? >> what's new about this report is for the past 18 years the united nation's climate change has been working towards one specific goal. that is cutting carbon emissions before the global average temperature increases by two degrees celsius or 3.6 degrees fahrenheit. that's the critical point we can't go past. it's a point of no return. what this study tells us is that the culmination of the carbon dioxide that's already in the atmosphere and the carbon dioxide that's projected to come into the atmosphere over the next few years with development from india and china is already so much that it is almost inevitable that we will go past that two-degree... that two-degree critical mark. we're pretty much on track at this point now to go past the point that we've all been trying to avoid. >> ifill: if we go past it, what happens? >> it's a big point. the two-degree mark is the point
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 7:00pm PST
. the consumer discretionary sector gained 3% in november. among utility stocks today, duke energy jumped 2.3%. the firm has been subject to a board room drama since july. c.e.o. jim rogers has agreed to retire at the end of next year. on the consumer side, wal-mart added 1.7%, ending at a three week high. this was the biggest gain of any dow jones stock today. if you use fed-ex you may be paying more next year. the delivery company will raise its ground and home delivery shipping fees at average of 4.9% next year. the higher prices didn't lead to a higher share price today. the stock fell 1.4%. fed-ex has warned of customers seeking out cheaper shipping options. meantime, the inability to raise prices hit versign. you may recognize the company logo from the internet. verisign manages internet addresses, translating the web addresses into digits that computers use to communicate. the company won a new contract from the government to oversee web addresses, but it can't raise prices. and that sent shares plunging, falling 13.2%. volume jumped tenfold. this is its lowest price since december.
PBS
Dec 4, 2012 7:00pm PST
from the international energy agency, calling for the u.s. to surpass saudi arabia as the world's largest oil producer by 2020. here's one good thing to come from the destruction of hurricane sandy-- verizon customers will be getting faster, and more, telecom services. the company said today it is replacing damaged copper wires with fiber optic cable. that upgrade from older, slower copper allows verizon to offer more digital services, including bundling phone, internet and cable tv. and it means an increase in revenues for verizon. tom, that was the message from verizon's c.e.o., speaking at an investor conference today. but it didn't do much for the stock. verizon shares fell, like many of its fellow dow components trading here on the big board. >> tom: let's get going with tonight's "market focus." with no big economic data for cues, stocks finished a lackluster day in negative territory. the s&p 500 struggled to find a clear direction and spent most of the session in the red. it ended with a small loss of two tenths of 1%. trading volume continued to be moderate-- 674 millio
PBS
Dec 6, 2012 12:00pm PST
, energy independence, infrastructure and research and development that ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> rose: tell me how you found the president. not in terms of the sort of term temperment in terms of where his mind is set at this moment. >> there was a little bit of chitchat before we started the interview and i had the opportunity to congratulate him for the first time since his election. and i said you've been a little busy. he said yes no trip to disneyworld for me. so he seemed a little tired. he seemed a little frustrated at the pace of how these negotiations are going. but he also came across as the cool, calm, no drama obama that we've come to know from him as a candidate and as president. he really was very firm. we kept trying to push him on this tax issue, and he looks
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)